Not a reader? We understand. Not everyone likes to read. But, once in a while a book comes along that has the potential to change your life. A book that is worth the investment of your time and energy. We believe that Restored and Remarried is that book. Check out these interviews and see for yourself. We think you'll agree... Restored and Remarried is the book that may save your remarriage and step family.

 

Each interview is conversational in style, so they are easy and fun to watch. They deal with real remarriage and step family issues in a bold, lively and relevant manner. Gil and Brenda Stuart share honestly and candidly from their hearts and it shows. They share from real life, pulling from "dirt under the finger nails" experience.

 

Listen or watch a clip…You'll be encouraged.

2017 Couples Retreat for Blended Families

Focus on The Family Radio Interview

July 2016

Focus on The Family Radio Interview

Listen to Part 1

Listen to Part 2

February 2016

Family Life Marriage Cruise

June 2015

Today's Family Experience

August 2012

Hosting Marriage Team Radio

July 2012

Hosting Marriage Team Radio

June 2011

Hosting Marriage Team Radio

R&R Promo Video

Oxygen 365 by Stronger Families 2015

Faith Center Church 2014

100 Huntley Street with Moira Brown

100 Huntley Street with Moira Brown

August 2010

Hosting Marriage Team Radio

June 2010

Too Blessed to Be Stressed

Remarriage Stats

 

There are 35 million Americans in the US today who are remarried (US Census, 2007).

 

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There are an additional 36 million Americans who are divorced or widowed (possibly finding themselves in a remarriage at some point) (US Census, 2007).

 

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46 of every 100 marriages today is a remarriage for one or both partners. Of the remarriages, 24 are a remarriage for both persons. About 65% of remarriages involve children from the prior marriage and, thus, form stepfamilies. (US. Bureau of Statistics, 1995).

 

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Approximately one-third of all weddings in America today form stepfamilies.

 

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More than a quarter of the people who remarry are over 50 years of age.

 

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The divorce rate for remarried and stepfamily couples varies but is at least 60%. Second marriages (with or without children) have a 60% rate of divorce and 73% of third marriages end in divorce (U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2006); at least two-thirds of stepfamily couples divorce (Hetherington, For Better for Worse: Divorce Reconsidered, 2002).

 

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An estimated one-third of children will live in a stepparent home before the age of 18 (Parke, 2007) and 50% will have a stepparent at some point in their lifetime.

 

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One of three Americans currently has a steprelationship of some kind and it is estimated that 50% will during their lifetime. (Larson, 1992).

 

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On average, couples in stepfamilies have three times the amount of stress of couples in first marriages during the first few years (see Hetherington, For Better for Worse: Divorce Reconsidered, 2002, p. 165).

 

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Is there any good news? Yes. With time stress levels for couples in stepfamilies can fall to normal levels found in first marriages.

 

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African-American stepfamilies may adjust to stepfamily living more easily than White or Hispanic families. In general, family boundaries in African-American families are less rigid and more fluid than those of Whites. Throughout US history, black families have included fictive kin, i.e., people with no biological or legal tie to the family who are nevertheless considered family members. Given this cultural history, welcoming and bonding with new stepfamily members may be less intrusive and easier than in White families (Stewart, 2007, p. 148).

 

Larson, J. (1992). Understanding stepfamilies. American Demographics, 14, 360. Parker, K. (Jan 13, 2011). A Portrait of Stepfamilies. Pew Research Center report, http://pewsocialtrends.org/2011/01/13/a-portrait-of-stepfamilies/ Stewart, Susan D. (2007). Brave new stepfamilies: diverse paths toward stepfamily living. Sage Publications.

Interview with Jeff Kemp with Stronger Families, live on Face Book

AM Northwest interview with Northwest Family Services

Interview with the gals from the Full Circle Show in Toronto, Canada